X
GO

Dr. Michele Carbone's Scientific Publications

Mesothelioma: Scientific clues for prevention, diagnosis, and therapy

Mesothelioma: Scientific clues for prevention, diagnosis, and therapy

Published in Ca: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, online version on July 9, 2019

Mesothelioma affects mostly older individuals who have been occupationally exposed to asbestos. The global incidence and mortality rates are unknown, because data are not available from developing countries that continue to use large amounts of asbestos. The rate of mesothelioma has decreased in Australia, the United States, and Western Europe, where the use of asbestos was banned or strictly regulated in the 1970s and 1980s, demonstrating the value of these preventive measures. However, in these same countries, the overall number of deaths from mesothelioma has not decreased as the size of the population and the percentage of old people have increased. Moreover, hotspots of mesothelioma may occur when carcinogenic fibers that are present in the environment are disturbed as rural areas are being developed. Novel immunohistochemical and molecular markers have improved the accuracy of diagnosis; however, about 14% (high-resource countries) to 50% (developing countries) of mesothelioma diagnoses are incorrect, resulting in inadequate treatment and complicating epidemiological studies. The discovery that germline BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) mutations cause mesothelioma and other cancers (BAP1 cancer syndrome) elucidated some of the key pathogenic mechanisms, and treatments targeting these molecular mechanisms and/or modulating the immune response are being tested.  The role of surgery in pleural mesothelioma is controversial as it is difficult to predict who will benefit from aggressive management, even when local therapties are added to existing or novel systemic treatments. Treatment outcomes are improving, however, for peritoneal mesothelioma. Multidisciplinary international collaboration will be necessary to improve prevention, early detection, and treatment.
0 Comments
BAP1 regulates different mechanisms of cell death

BAP1 regulates different mechanisms of cell death

Cell Death & Disease, volume 9, Article number: 1151 (2018)

The ubiquitin carboxyl terminal BAP1 is a member of deubiquitinating enzymes superfamily, which are responsible for coordinating ubiquitin-signaling processes through the removal of ubiquitin from protein substrates. Studies of families with high incidence of mesothelioma led to the discovery that all affected family members carried heterozygous BAP1 mutations (BAP1+/−), a condition that was named “the BAP1 cancer syndrome”.

 

Since the initial discovery in 2011, over 100 families have been identified worldwide affected by the BAP1 cancer syndrome.

 

Authors: El Bachir Affar, Michele Carbone

0 Comments
Germline BAP1 mutations induce a Warburg effect

Germline BAP1 mutations induce a Warburg effect

Cell Death and Differentiation, June 30, 2017 (doi: 10.1038/cdd.2017.95)

Aerobic glycolysis, also known as the ‘Warburg effect’, does not necessarily occur as an adaptive process that is consequence of carcinogenesis, but rather that it may also predate malignancy by many years and facilitate carcinogenesis.
0 Comments
BAP1 regulates IP3R3-mediated Ca2+ flux to mitochondria suppressing cell transformation

BAP1 regulates IP3R3-mediated Ca2+ flux to mitochondria suppressing cell transformation

Nature International Weekly Journal of Science (2017) - doi:10.1038/nature22798

A mechanistic rationale for the ability of BAP1 to regulate gene-environment interaction in human carcinogenesis

0 Comments
Our Team's Work

Our Team's Work

A Review of our Projects, Publications, and Discoveries

A summary of the research and publications produced by our team over the last two years.

View our presentation - Carbone-Full-Presentation-06042017.pdf
0 Comments
RSS
123